Additional Needs & Military Veterans

PHOTO CREDITS: Reflections Photography

Need

Many children and young people in the UK are currently missing out on the opportunity to learn lifelong transferable skills as they are being failed by the education system. There are many reasons for this including: (i) children with special needs often have to wait months or years both for a diagnosis and then to be placed in an appropriate educational setting; (ii) a lack of suitable training for educational professionals and (iii) a lack of alternative education provision.

Solution

Rangers Riding Ranch offers equine assisted learning enabling children and young people with additional needs a non-classroom-based environment in which they can learn and develop a range
of lifelong transferable skills they will be able to use throughout their life and in the workplace. There is a wide body of research that shows that these skills can successfully be taught to these
target groups through contact with animals helping them both educationally and emotionally.

Impact

The lifelong transferable skills children and young people learn at Rangers Riding Ranch provides them with invaluable tools to use throughout their lives and to potentially take into the workplace. The development of these skills can be demonstrated through their increased ability to undertake activities to care for animals with decreasing amounts of supervision. We also receive feedback from parents/carers on how these skills are being used outside of the project.

Military Veterans

 Many military veterans leave active service with a wide range of visible (for example, life changing
injuries) and invisible (for example, mental health issues including PTSD) challenges which impacts
on their ability to transition back into civilian life.

Rangers Riding Ranch offers equine assisted learning to teach military veterans a range of skills to help them overcome the challenges they are facing as a result of serving their country, as well as with the transition back into civilian life.

Working with horses is a good way of achieving this as horses are so well suited to assisting in therapeutic situations, and research has shown that working with horses improves the overall quality of life on physiological, psychological, and spiritual levels. Although horses have their own unique histories, personalities, moods, and needs for connection, they function within a herd, and just observing herd behaviour can make humans aware of their own challenges. This is especially significant for military veterans who are conditioned to be on alert and aware of themselves and others.

Horses can help military veterans learn to develop the relationships they need to reconnect with their communities, each other, and their families. Research has demonstrated that even caring for horses by grooming, feeding, and being around them has positive effects on physiological and psychological functioning. Equine-assisted learning allows military veterans to experiment with caring for another again. The relationship that develops between the military veteran and horse becomes a powerful change agent.

PHOTO CREDITS: Reflections Photography

HOW TO ATTEND

We welcome referrals from Schools; GPs; other medical staff (including counsellors; occupational therapists and physiotherapists) as well as from other charities and non-profit making organisations working with children and young people with additional needs and military veterans. To make a referral please contact us... (linked here)